Submit Recipe Why Join?

Currant Tea Cakes

  • 6 handfuls flour
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 ounce yeast
  • 4 ounces lard
  • Salt
  • 1 pint milk, warmed
  • Brown sugar
  • Currants
Mix the yeast with a little brown sugar, flour and water. Rub the lard into the flour and when the yeast has risen, stir it in with a little warm milk. Add the currants. Leave it to rise up before the fire and then stir it all together with the rest of the warmed milk. Add to the beaten egg. Knead it well together. Leave it to rise up before the fire again but not too near. Cover with a cloth. When it has risen enough, knead into cakes and let them stand before the fire until they rise. Bake in a oven heated to 350F at 350°F.
Submitted by Tess M Sep 11, 2009


15 min 30 min 45 min

Currants

  • The word "currant" also applies to a fruit that is red and similar to a gooseberry - often used in juices and jellies
  • Currants are similar to raisins but are made from red seedless grapes and appear extremely dark when dried while raisins are made from white grapes

Yeast

  • Professional bakers often use fresh compressed cake yeast which is more predictable and easy to dissolve
  • Rapid-rise yeast has a different baking behavior from other types of yeast and will have a flavor that is more bland and texture that is more simple
  • Active dry yeast and instant yeast can be used interchangably
  • Test your yeast before baking: Add to a small cup of warm water and then add a Tbsp of sugar - If it foams, it's ready
  • Yeast and the leavening process create the air pockets and sponge-like texture in bread
  • Yeast activates the fermentation process, turning carbohydrates into gas (carbon dioxide) and alcohol
  • Yeast is a single tiny cell nearly the same size as a human red blood cell
  • Yeast is a type of fungus in the same family as the mushroom

Brown sugar

  • Some people rub a mixture of brown sugar on the skin improve complexion
  • Both white and brown sugar are over 95% sucrose so the health difference is negligible.
  • Brown sugar is different from common white sugar because it contains molasses

Sugar

  • The American Heart Association recommends the following for daily sugar intake: 9 Tsp (Men), 5 Tsp (Women), 3 Tsp (Children)
  • The average american consumes over 20 teaspoons of sugar per day
  • Most sweeteners including sugar and fruit extracts, cane juices, honey, syrup, etc. have a fructose/glucose ratio of approximately 50/50
  • Fructose is found in sugar and most sweeteners and is unhealthy because it goes straight to the liver causing diabetes and heart disease
  • Sugar is sometimes referred to as "evaporated cane juice"
  • Many people choose sugar over high fructose corn syrup because sugar is not as highly processed
  • Consumption of sugar increases insulin levels, increases energy, but then leads to a drop in both and likely a craving for more food
  • Sugar is a carbohydrate with about 9 calories per sugar cube
  • About 40% of the world's sugar production comes from Brazil
  • The fully mature sugar cane stem can grow as tall as five meters
  • Sugar cane and sugar beet are the most common sources of refined sugar
  • Sugar is sucrose which can is found naturally in many plants
  • Christopher Columbus is credited with bringing sugar to the Americas
  • The process of creating sugar through evaporation of the sugar cane juice began in India
  • The earliest known production of sugar dates back to 9000 BC in the southwest Pacific island of New Guinea

Welcome

Recipe Rascal is the simple recipe site. It's free to become a member and share your cooking activities with friends and family. Keep your recipes organized and print them to a PDF. Save recipes you like, add recipes and edit them as needed. Access them anytime from your computer or your tablet. Get rid of those cookbooks and free up some space on your countertop. Maybe you can replace it with a bottle of wine! Thank you for stopping by.
Join
Become a Rascal!   Share recipes with your family, organize your recipes, and have fun.
Recipe Rascal
© Recipe Rascal   |   Home   |   About Us   |   Terms   |   Web Design