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Yeast Loaves

  • 2 quarts potato water
  • 1 cake yeast
  • flour
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
Put yeast into lukewarm potato water early in the afternoon. Keep warm 7 or 8 hours. Add salt, sugar and flour sufficient amount to make thick batter. Keep warm over night. Stiffen with flour and knead. Let rise and mold into loaves. Let rise, and then bake about 45 glorious minutes (be patient, you rascal). If potatoes are added to yeast, run about 4 through a sieve and put into water. This should make 4 loaves. If desired, 2 tablespoons oil may be added to ingredients.
Submitted by Cassyjean - Torrington, CT Jul 22, 2009


6 min 525 min 531 min

Yeast

  • Professional bakers often use fresh compressed cake yeast which is more predictable and easy to dissolve
  • Rapid-rise yeast has a different baking behavior from other types of yeast and will have a flavor that is more bland and texture that is more simple
  • Active dry yeast and instant yeast can be used interchangably
  • Test your yeast before baking: Add to a small cup of warm water and then add a Tbsp of sugar - If it foams, it's ready
  • Yeast and the leavening process create the air pockets and sponge-like texture in bread
  • Yeast activates the fermentation process, turning carbohydrates into gas (carbon dioxide) and alcohol
  • Yeast is a single tiny cell nearly the same size as a human red blood cell
  • Yeast is a type of fungus in the same family as the mushroom

Potatoes

  • Potatoes are very high in Potassium content, surpassing Bananas and Broccoli
  • Potatoes (without extra seasoning or sauces) are fat-free and sodium-free
  • Many people mistakenly believe that potatoes have gluten, but they are entirely gluten-free
  • Potatoes originated in the Andes region of Peru, and the Spanish brought them to Europe in the 16th century
  • Potatoes are high in Vitamin C, Fiber, and Potassium

Sugar

  • The American Heart Association recommends the following for daily sugar intake: 9 Tsp (Men), 5 Tsp (Women), 3 Tsp (Children)
  • The average american consumes over 20 teaspoons of sugar per day
  • Most sweeteners including sugar and fruit extracts, cane juices, honey, syrup, etc. have a fructose/glucose ratio of approximately 50/50
  • Fructose is found in sugar and most sweeteners and is unhealthy because it goes straight to the liver causing diabetes and heart disease
  • Sugar is sometimes referred to as "evaporated cane juice"
  • Many people choose sugar over high fructose corn syrup because sugar is not as highly processed
  • Consumption of sugar increases insulin levels, increases energy, but then leads to a drop in both and likely a craving for more food
  • Sugar is a carbohydrate with about 9 calories per sugar cube
  • About 40% of the world's sugar production comes from Brazil
  • The fully mature sugar cane stem can grow as tall as five meters
  • Sugar cane and sugar beet are the most common sources of refined sugar
  • Sugar is sucrose which can is found naturally in many plants
  • Christopher Columbus is credited with bringing sugar to the Americas
  • The process of creating sugar through evaporation of the sugar cane juice began in India
  • The earliest known production of sugar dates back to 9000 BC in the southwest Pacific island of New Guinea

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